7 Ways to Help Food Cravings On a Diet

I had a lady tell me recently that she wanted to lose weight, but was not willing to make the kind of changes necessary to her diet because it is “too hard” to give up foods that she craves.

I have written about how certain foods have been created by companies, after their own scientists have experimented on combinations of sugar, salt and fat, to the point of what causes pleasure to the brain–therefore causing the brain to crave those food items later when the pleasure is needed. People want to increase those pleasurable points especially in times of stress or boredom. But, how different is this kind of need to any other common addiction?
And if you don’t care about yourself, think about your kids. If continue eating this way, and teaching your children to eat this way, you are preparing them for a possible life of disease and early death.

Yes, it is hard to get through the first week or two (stage one) of a lifestyle food change (diet) because you are fighting off physiological and psychological cravings. So, besides taking an appetite suppressant temporarily until your boys is used to the correctly sized portions and the correct healthy foods.

-7 ways to help deal with cravings.

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1. Hunger can make you crave food, so eat every 3 to 4 hours

If you go longer than five hours without food, your blood sugar will drop and your cravings will begin, You need to eat every 3 to 4 hours. If it’s time for an allowed snack, choose food low in calories and fat.

2. Eat protein in every meal to fend off cravings.

You should include some source of lean protein, such as skinless chicken or turkey, fish, eggs, or low-fat cheese. Protein helps to control blood sugar patterns and can help prevent food cravings, Foods containing protein also help you feel fuller by stimulating production of cholecystokinin (CKK), a naturally occurring appetite suppressant.

**AND most IMPORTANTLY–always eat breakfast protein. Research shows that starting your day off with breakfast helps in burning fat and in cutting down cravings.

3. Drink your liquids.

Dehydration can cause some people to crave salty foods. The solution is simple: Drink more water. An 8-ounce glass of refreshing water can help you feel full and get your mind off your food cravings of the moment. In fact, what you think are food cravings may actually be thirst. Drink water and the food cravings should go away. Keep a water bottle handy throughout the day to make it easy to satisfy your fluid needs.

4. Keep busy.

When the craving is psychological, it is meeting a need different from hunger. Hunger caused by boredom, anxiety, or other emotions is by finding an activity that will take your mind off your craving without adding calories. Call a friend. Exercise. Tune into a ballgame. Listen to music. Read a mystery. Watch a movie. Find something to do.

5. Finding something you enjoy doing

Another way to beat food cravings when they are psychological is to replace eating with an activity you find pleasurable and emotionally satisfying, Do something you really enjoy that doesn’t involve an intake of calories: Take a bubble bath, read a fun magazine, do your nails, go have coffee with a friend.. Or look for options that burn calories, like taking a long walk with a special someone. It’s a way of being kind to yourself without sabotaging your weight-loss efforts.

6. Eat less refined foods and corn syrup and DO eat MORE FIBER

Research suggests that some people can become addicted to refined foods, such as white bread, white pasta, and white sugar. The more you eat, the more you want. Break the cycle. Eliminate refined foods from your diet and you could curb your food cravings. Go the extra step and refine your diet by replacing the refined foods with whole grains and fiber— eat more nuts, beans, legumes, fruits, vegetables, and whole-wheat foods. Remember that fiber makes you fuller and is great for your digestion.

**Fiber fill you up, makes you feel less hungry!

And when you’re scaling back on refined sugars, be sure to target high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). HFCS is used as a sweetener in many foods, from bread to frozen dinners, because it’s inexpensive and increases shelf life. New research shows that high fructose corn syrup can be a trigger food in animals — having even a tiny amount will make them want more. Scientists are studying whether HFCS may have the same effect in humans.

7. Find healthy great-tasting alternatives

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I have put up Jorge Cruz’ recipe for a small microwaved-made chocolate cake, which is low carb and delish. I have discussed cauliflower-based pizza, low carb tortillas and recipes using them. I have listed sites like Netrition.com, Carbessentials.net and Lindora.com, for example, which have food items for low carb cooking and baking. There are great tasting low carb alternatives for bagels (Western Bagel’s Perfect 10 bagel), low carb baking mixes, pancake mixes, pasta. I have put up different recipes and even mentioned low carb websites and cook/baking books.

I have discussed portion control and how you have to eat often and especially breakfast. I have discussed the importance of measuring g food and learning shortcuts for measurement (a portion of meat is the size of the palm of your hand or a deck of cards). I have also mentioned 4 small servings of veggies a day, two of fruit, which fruits are lower carb than others, etc.

If you insist on eating easy-to-buy and pre-made food items or fast food, (which are NOT diet friendly), despite your desire to lose weight or constant complaints about how you look or how tight your clothes look on you (and you think a little exercise is the only thing that will help–but for years now–it has not), then you are not going to lose weight.

You have to be willing to learn about new foods, look up carb counts, get out of your chair and stop being lazy. There are good alternatives out there, so get cracking at looking things up on Google and finally be skinny. Either use the tools or forever hold your peace. Find the time–you are worth it.

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